Home » Posts tagged 'The End'

Tag Archives: The End

Return to Dyson’s Delve – Levels 9 & 10

This is the final month of redrawing Dyson’s Delve – today we get levels 9 & 10 of the redraw, and later this week I’ll be releasing the final level (11) as well as the all-new surface level of the mini mega dungeon.

At the end of this month, a PDF will be released to all patrons of the blog on Patreon (regardless of backer level) with the new version of Dyson’s Delve.

Dyson's Delve 2019 - Level 9Dyson’s Delve 2019 – Level 9

Level 9 is home to petrifying monstrosities, a “noble” court of wererats, and a massive worm (but not quite as massive as a purple worm – fortunately B/X D&D includes the smaller Caecilia which fills the same role while being a more appropriate challenge for this level).

The natural cave section on the northeast side of the map contains links up and down between the levels, and is also connected to the main level albeit through a secret door, essentially making these two sections separate.

Dyson's Delve 2019 - Level 10Dyson’s Delve 2019 – Level 10

This level is unusual in that it is broken up into three distinct areas. One can only be reached from level 9, one from level 11, and the last is the route used to get from level 9 to level 11.

This level of the dungeon finally brings in the big bad of the whole dungeon, but he can only be reached after the party has been to level 11.

The big bad guy? It wouldn’t be Dungeons & Dragons if there wasn’t a dragon somewhere in the dungeon.

patreon-supported-banner

The maps on Dyson’s Dodecahedron are released for free personal use thanks to the support of awesome patrons like you over on Patreon. Every month 400 patrons come together to make these releases possible. You can help too in order to keep the flow of maps coming and to improve their quality – and even get a map of your own!

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

Shadows of the Ruinous Powers – Session 1

(Being a series of quick game notes trying to account for the events of many sessions of playing through The Enemy Within using the Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay 1e rules)

Session 1

The Enemy Within

  • Kazgar [Gunner]
  • Larry [Bawd]
  • Othmar [Bunko Artist]
  • Gottlieb [Hunter]
  • Wilfried [Bawd]
  • Magnus Gunnar
  • Oscar Jager [Body Guard]

The session begins with the adventurers gathering on their way to Altdorf where Crown Prince Hergard von Tasseninck of the Grand Principality of Ostland is hiring adventurers for 20GC or more per day for “a most perilous mission into unexplored regions of the Grey Mountains.”

They arrive at the Coach and Horses Inn run by Gustav Fondleburger and hire their way onto a coach from the Ratchett Lines of Altdorf which already has a few people riding it:

• Gunnar (Drunken Coachman)
• Hultz (Also Drunken Coachman)
• Lady Isolde von Strudeldorf (Young Noble)
• Janna (Lady Isolde’s servant)
• Marie (Lady Isolde’s one-eyed Kislevite bodyguard)
• Ernst Heidelmann (Physician’s Apprentice)
• Philipe Descartes (Bretonnian Gambler)

They played several games of cards with Philipe (everyone coming close to breaking even in the end) and acquire a few rumours at the Coach and Horses Inn:

The road to Altdorf is troubled by bandits. Only last week a coach failed to get through. These are troubled tmes and it’s about time that the Emperor started looking after the common folk.
• The village of Teufelfeuer was recently burnt down by Fabergus Heinzdork, the witch-hunter. Fabergus had discovered that the villagers were in league with demons – something to do with them eating raw meat!
• A small village in the Shadow Woods is having some trouble with wolves. Seems their militia can’t even handle a few mangy dogs!
• The roads are getting worse because the Emperor is not bothering to maintain them anymore – he is too busy spending money on the Imperial Army.
• The weather is going to take a turn for the worse. It’s going to rain tomorrow and for a few days after.
• A merchant returning from Grossbad was attacked by a small band of Goblins. He managed to flee but his consignment of ale bound for Regensdorf was stolen. Still, at least the Goblins will be so drunk that they won’t pose a threat to anyone else!
• The roadwardens are all corrupt and can’t be trusted.
• The Mayor of Grunburg was burnt at the stake a few months ago for being in league with “Chaos Spawn”. He had been overheard talking to his cat and feeding it human blood in its milk. More than one witness proclaimed that he had heard the mayor telling his cat to “Drink your bloody milk!”
• There’s a dark rumour going around that children are being sacrificed to foul demons near some wee village in the Forest of Shadows – Regensdorf I think it was.

The trip the next morning is a disaster, with hungover coachmen, wheels flying off the coach, people vomiting in Lady Strudeldorf’s impressive box of hats, and finally a mutant ambush that includes Rolf Hurtsis, a thief who was known to Othmar. The mutants were cut down and all characters received 75XP.

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

Shadows of the Ruinous Powers – Intro

For the last year I’ve been running a Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay (1e) campaign running through the classic “The Enemy Within” series (with a little bit added or subtracted here and there).

We play almost every second week, and are almost 30 sessions into the campaign now (and our math indicates we’re looking at another 46 sessions to get to the end).

Some time (18 months?) ago, Cubicle 7 had the full Warhammer FRP 2e collection up on Humble Bundle, and it came with the 1e rulebook too. And they announced that they would be releasing the Enemy Within in PDF also. Excited by the chance to pick them up, I decided I would run it finally (after being part of a botched playthrough once as a player). So I started shopping around online and somehow now I have just about the whole 1e collection in print.

One thing with the Enemy Within – it is a pretty open-ended campaign where the players can easily “go off the rails” and stop running through the campaign as written and run off and do their own things instead. This is something I love as a GM – but I also really want to run the campaign in its entirety. So that was the deal when I put out the call for players. We would be playing WHFRP1e as written, and we would try to keep things on track to stick to the adventures in order to play through them all.

With that social contract in place, we’ve only had one occasion where we’ve actually had to stop play for me to tell the group that I love their plan, and I would run with it and have a great time, but it would mean ditching the adventures as written and moving into running whatever the party gets into at that point. So the party took it as a “if we lose now, we know that we really survived this already with our main plan”, and then metagamed a few ideas as to why they would stick it out instead of skipping town that night. A few other times we had a bit of metagaming regarding their next step (I’ve never had such a hard time getting a group to take a free vehicle to segue into the next adventure!)

I’ve been taking a lot of notes during the progress of the campaign, and instead of keeping them locked away for the players and I to read, I figured I would start posting the game reports here to the blog. The actual play reports the players get are also stuffed full of maps and illustrations from the adventures we are playing, but those are all copyright by their respective owners, so they won’t be appearing in the blog formatted play reports.

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

Slaughter in the Halfling Village [NGR Play Report]

In our weekly Neoclassical Geek Revival game I had to make a new character because last session ended in what I think was the most perfect TPK I’ve had in ages. We actually almost succeeded at our mission (we run about a 25% success rate currently), got home, and then succumbed to our wounds – dying from disease and mutation and injury in the end-of-session “downtime”.

So I made a new character to join our brave guild of adventurers – Gerold Taskooveras (Jerry). Jerry’s background had him start as a beggar, become a pickpocket, and then spend a few years locked away for his crimes. He’s just been released from jail and has travelled into the hinterlands to make an “honest” living. He’s two parts rogue, one part fool.

Instead of going back (once again) into Elfbreaker Mountain to try to reclaim the dwarven ancestor’s corpse for her clan, we chased after a halfling who had been through town a couple of hours before trying to post a notice on the town notice board, but who left when he couldn’t reach it and no one in town would stop laughing at him long enough to help.

Next thing we know (after a quick NPC death at a “one of us lies, one of us tells the truth” riddle at a pair of bridges), we are setting up the defenses for a small halfling village (think Willow) against barbarian raiders. Thirty barbarian raiders. My foolish thief and a moderately high level elven warrior (who was not at the last session, so he didn’t die). Guerrilla defenses, tower defenses, and a lot of fighting later and we manage to hold off the raiders for two nights… but on the third night we end up in a duel between the elf and their leader. Except they also brought their three wise women to banish the foul elf from the land.

So… we can assume that the halfling village doesn’t exist anymore. We kind of hope the raiders wiped it out completely because otherwise stories might come back of how I picked up the elf and ran for the hills instead of standing to fight.

Remember that 25% mission success rate up there? Yeah, this was another one in the 75%.

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

Return to Dyson’s Delve!

It’s been almost nine years since Dyson’s Delve was released piecemeal on this blog. I labeled it my “mini mega dungeon” – an eleven level dungeon where each level’s map fit nicely within my small graph paper pad (nothing over 17 x 17 squares in total area).

There were a few places where I stretched the standard adventure design parameters a bit (while treasure is within the bounds of the treasure type tables of the game, they are significantly weighted towards the rich end of play in order to provide the XP needed for a party to level up at a rate of roughly 1 character level per 2 dungeon levels completed).

Over those nine years my cartography has seen a slight improvement and I’ve been redrawing the various levels of the Delve this year and posting them here two at a time.

Towards the end of this month, I’ll be posting the last three levels of the Delve’s new maps, as well as a never-before-posted map of the surface area where the delve is located.

What I’m doing right now though is collecting all those maps and redoing the layout of the adventure into a coherent whole to be reissued as this month’s Patreon-Exclusive release. Aside from the new surface area there will be a minimum of changes from the original adventure. I’m adding some development notes, and I’m working on a two-page appendix for running it using the most current edition of D&D – but the heart of this is still an 11-level B/X D&D dungeon adventure designed to take characters from level 1 to 6.

All patrons of the Patreon Campaign will receive a free PDF of this exclusive reissue – and it will remain exclusive to patrons for roughly a year before it becomes a commercial release.

dysons-delve-promo

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

Dungeoneer’s Survival Guide Perspective Map

When I got a copy of the Dungeoneer’s Survival Guide some 33 years ago, it was a flood of information, rules I would consistently ignore, scraps about the underdark for the first time since the D series of adventures…

And a collection of pages at the back on drawing perspective-based maps. Not the isometric (axonometric) projections of Castle Ravenloft, but grids set at various perspectives and rotations along with instructions on photocopying and cutting them up, or tracing them in order to draw multi-tiered maps of some of the larger spaces in the underdark.

33 years later, I finally did it.

I ended up choosing a grid that looks a lot like an isometric projection instead of a perspective piece, and following the directions for tracing the grid for a section, then moving the grid and tracing the next section produces very… vertical separations between elevations.

Dungeoneer Survival Guide Projection 1Dungeoneer Survival Guide Projection 1

The end result is a multi-tiered open space to explore – a large uneven “cave” (that has definitely been modified by the residents over the ages) with ramps and stairs between sections.

I’m definitely going to take another shot at this using a grid that has a stronger perspective and probably a smaller space to try to make something more like a traditional cavern. But I’m spectacularly happy with this piece, and glad that I finally drew it after 33 years of “planning to draw it”.

patreon-supported-banner

The maps on Dyson’s Dodecahedron are released for free personal use thanks to the support of awesome patrons like you over on Patreon. Every month 400 patrons come together to make these releases possible. You can help too in order to keep the flow of maps coming and to improve their quality – and even get a map of your own!

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

[Daily Drawings] Week of June 30th

So… the whole Daily Drawings tag may be a mistake here. I’m just so over my head with commissioned work that I’m not finding the time to draw as I would like to.

First, the Battlephant, a quick doodle I did early in the week. I was thinking of mounting it on the hovercraft plates of the vehicles from the Matrix, but in the end it never got any form of locomotion.

BattlephantBattlephant

Inspired at least in part by the egg-shaped device that floats over the head of the Techno-Pope, we have this egg-shaped thing.

Floaty Egg ThingFloaty Egg Thing

And then, for the first time in my modern career, I started playing with colours. You can tell I was getting a grip on the tools while doing the walls and I had a much better idea of how everything worked by the time I got to the egg.

Colourized Floaty Egg

Colourized Floaty Egg

And that is the week in Dyson Doodles.

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

Temple of the Seven Heretics

These lands were once the territories of the god-king Zueshel who was struck down by the Culling Blade wielded by each of the Seven Heretics in turn. Through the blade it is said that they each gained a portion of his power. Modern heretics say that this runs against the very beliefs of the Seven Heretics, who struck down Zueshel while announcing that he was no god to begin with.

Temple of the Seven HereticsTemple of the Seven Heretics

Regardless, with the end of Zueshel’s reign, the people turned their worship to the Seven Heretics and a number of temples were built around the land. The greatest of these is said to house their bodies in a secret crypt, where they remain as they were when the heretics died – never decomposing.

patreon-supported-banner

This map is made available to you under a free license for personal or commercial use thanks to the awesome supporters of my Patreon Campaign. Over 400 amazingly generous people have come together to fund the site and these maps, making them free for your use.

Because of the incredible generosity of my patrons, I’m able to make these maps free for commercial use also. Each month while funding is over the $300 mark, each map that achieves the $300+ funding level will be released under this free commercial license. You can use, reuse, remix and/or modify the maps that are being published under this commercial license on a royalty-free basis as long as they include attribution (“Cartography by Dyson Logos” or “Maps by Dyson Logos”). For those that want/need a Creative Commons license, it would look something like this:

Creative Commons LicenseCartography by Dyson Logos is licensed
under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

Adventures in Cromspoint

I’m playing in an awesome Neoclassical Geek Revival RPG campaign right now called “Age of Myth” where we are one of two PC groups competing to achieve the “victory conditions” of the game setting – in this case to form a kingdom by first uniting three iron age clans into a tribe, and then uniting three of these tribes into a kingdom. (The last campaign we played was also competitive, and while our group was the first to discover the location of the end-point of the campaign, we were beat to actually recovering the Eye of Set by the other group.)

Adventures in CromspointAdventures in Cromspoint

The game takes place in Cromspoint, pictured here. I BELIEVE that Zzarchov is creating the hexmaps for these campaigns using a random map generator, and adjusting it to his taste. This is my interpretation of the campaign map as it stood in year 11 of the campaign (we are just starting year 13 next session – we have one session per season, 4 sessions per year).

I won’t add much more detail about the campaign, and what we are doing in it, as at least one member of the other group will be reading this.

patreon-supported-banner

The maps on Dyson’s Dodecahedron are released for free personal use thanks to the support of awesome patrons like you over on Patreon. Every month 400 patrons come together to make these releases possible. You can help too in order to keep the flow of maps coming and to improve their quality – and even get a map of your own!

 

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

Temple of the Mad Titan

I’m often asked about the scale of the maps I post. In truth, I don’t include a scale on my maps because either it is pretty obvious (when drawing houses and similar structures – where a square is 3 to 5 feet), or more likely because I want the end user to pick a scale that works best for them. In the inner workings of my head, you can assume that I’m thinking at a scale of 10′ per square when drawing most of my maps as that is the traditional scale for D&D maps which is where I cut my teeth.

Temple of the Mad TitanTemple of the Mad Titan

But for the Temple of the Mad Titan, 10 feet per square just isn’t going to cut it. Let’s crank this one up to 20 or maybe even 50 feet. A structure of Brobdingnagian proportions, the temple is made of almost inconceivably large blocks of stone and rests atop a massive cloud. At the heart of this immense structure is the throne of the mad titan.

But he is rarely found there – but always nearby. He is bound to the throne by magical chains that give him some freedom of movement within the structure, but not quite enough to get to the massive entrance and thus he is trapped here with freedom always just in sight. Some days he stands in the great hall in front of the heart chamber and raves against his captors and the world. On bad days he will hide behind the throne or in one of the nearby alcoves, hiding from the light of day and the fresh air.

patreon-supported-banner

The maps on Dyson’s Dodecahedron are released for free personal use thanks to the support of awesome patrons like you over on Patreon. Every month 400 patrons come together to make these releases possible. You can help too in order to keep the flow of maps coming and to improve their quality – and even get a map of your own!

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

Rose Point Manor

At the end of Rose Lane is Rose Point Manor – home of the last of the elven line of Heare and their three servants. Keeping with the name, the manor house has a number of rose bushes around it and the window shutters are painted in a rose motif.

The original manor was a much grander affair, but burned down nearly 200 years ago. The new manor was built over the same foundations, and if you were to find your way into the basement, the stairs down are still cracked and charred from that night when most of the line of Heare was lost.

Rose Point ManorRose Point Manor

The new manor is almost entirely made of stone – even the elegantly painted window shutters are made of thin slate, and much of the furniture is made of iron and steel. The elven lord of the house, Krennheon Heare, is somber and keeps much to themself, spending most of their time in study and contemplation of the arcane and the past greatness of their lineage. Occasionally guests are admitted to the manor to discuss matters of history or arcane legend – usually in the sitting room with the bay windows at the front of the structure, and occasionally back to the dining room where ancient brandies are shared over even more ancient tales.

patreon-supported-banner

This map is made available to you under a free license for personal or commercial use thanks to the awesome supporters of my Patreon Campaign. Over 400 amazingly generous people have come together to fund the site and these maps, making them free for your use.

Because of the incredible generosity of my patrons, I’m able to make these maps free for commercial use also. Each month while funding is over the $300 mark, each map that achieves the $300+ funding level will be released under this free commercial license. You can use, reuse, remix and/or modify the maps that are being published under this commercial license on a royalty-free basis as long as they include attribution (“Cartography by Dyson Logos” or “Maps by Dyson Logos”). For those that want/need a Creative Commons license, it would look something like this:

Creative Commons LicenseCartography by Dyson Logos is licensed
under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

2018 Commercial Map Pack

In 2018 we released a total of 71 maps under the royalty-free commercial use license.

Based on the regular requests for updates to last year’s collection of all the commercial releases to the end of 2017, I’ve collected these 71 maps (along with a few alternate versions of some of them) and made them available as a zipped collection via DriveThruRPG.

Note that there is NOTHING in this package that you can’t get by surfing through the site and grabbing the commercial-licensed maps. It exists for those people who want (a) a collection of all these commercial maps and/or (b) to feel better when they pay for these maps.

Dyson Logos 2018 Commercial Map Pack on DriveThruRPG

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

9 years of maps!

In May the Dodecahedron will be a decade old… and that has me in “holy crap, flashbacks!” mode. So I thought I should pull up a self-indulgent look-and-see of how my cartography has changed over the last nine years.

I’m posting two maps from each year, one in June and one in December of that year, and focusing on dungeon maps primarily to keep the comparisons “fair”. That map at the top of 2009 was one of the very first I ever posted to the blog. It is painfully low-resolution and it turns out I can’t find the original anywhere, and don’t have any higher resolution scans of it around. I might even redraw it at some point.

Much of the end of 2009 and 2010 was spent on my “Geomorph Mapping Project” to draw at least 100 interlocking geomorphs. We closed out 2010 with Dyson’s Delve, my mini-mega-dungeon. In 2009 and 2010 I still use “pencil thin” walls – as you can see in the geomorphs and the Dyson’s Delve map. This is something I moved rapidly away from as I developed my style, and have only started sort of coming back to (using thick sharpie markers for walls) in the last year.

These two maps from 2011 showcase my work as it locks into a definite style – avoiding single-stroke walls, adding more detail, and obviously a lot more comfortable with my work. The thick black walls and heavy hatching have become very clear by this point and many of the maps from this year are among my favourites of my older work.

2012 was a bit of a rough spell for me. When I started posting to the blog I was off work on disability for nerve damage. When my workplace disability ran out and I was transferring over to the provincial disability program, I went through several months on the lowest tier of social support, and this kept me from both the internet and from doing much drawing. The maps in 2012 are much sparser and less defined than in 2011, and are a lot less frequent on the blog. But that all changed in December of 2012 with the release of Dyson’s Delves…

2013 sees my maps pick up in quality and quantity again. The feel of the 2011 maps returns, with more time spent per map and a lot of effort put into presentation and structure. This is the year where I start transitioning away from generic black gel pens for my maps and towards using archival felt-tipped pens (Mistubishi Uni Pins and Sakura Microns mostly). More and more of my maps are now being drawn with a grid base – not usually shown on the map proper, but most of the maps in this era through to the end of 2015 are drawn on graph paper, making them easier to use with traditional VTTs and similar.

2014 and 2015 exemplify the style I had developed up to this point. I stabilize to a regular release schedule of maps twice a week. The style is consistent and easy to read. The winter of 2014 includes the release of the Dyson Megadelve, a massive megadungeon project that spans over 30 maps of caverns, dungeons, mines, and the ruins of a dwarven city.

2015 sees the lines for walls gradually getting darker and heavier, making the maps that little bit easier to read.

2015 sees another big stylistic transition in my maps. First I move away from drawing on graph paper, instead drawing on white paper with a sheet of graph paper behind it as a guide.  The black lines of my walls thicken yet again, and for a large number of maps I move away from a photoshopped grid to a hand-drawn one.

The hand-drawn grid goes through several styles and iterations over the next few years. Some are better than others, and quite frankly some are disappointing when I look back on them now. Towards the end of the year I also transition from releasing maps as grayscale 300dpi JPG files to black and white 1200 dpi PNGs.

My work this year included a lot of larger commercial projects in addition to my blog maps – and again my style grows and changes. I get into more fine details and in the fall of 2018 I started doing more work digitally after drawing the map in my traditional manner – I often add a bit of shade to the crosshatched areas now, and a fine shadow to help make the walls feel a bit more raised.

 

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

Release the Kraken on White Crag Fortress

Release-The-Kraken

As our “release the Kraken” map this month, I’ve combined two linked releases from 2015 and put them together into a single map. Welcome back to White Crag Fortress.


No more than a generation ago did Hender, Warlord of the Two Realms, build the white fortress at the end of Merman’s Bluff. A small and fiercely held chunk of white granite looking over the dark and choppy seas where once the local fisherfolk made deals with the merpeople of the Octopus Kingdom.

The fortress has never fallen, but has changed hands with the winds of politics and the changing fortunes of those who have tried to hold it. The current “castellan” of the fortress is a netherman (half-goblin) who uses it as part of his claim upon the title of Warlord – although none (even those who traded him the fortress) will acknowledge it. From White Crag Fortress he taxes the local farmers and fishermen lightly, but maintains an army of half-breed mercenaries that earns everyone’s distrust.

White Crag FortressWhite Crag Fortress

White Crag Fortress is two discrete constructions – the Bailey Fort and the Spire. The Bailey Fort is separated from the mainland by a ditch dug into the spur of stone it is built into, with a permanent wooden bridge across leading into the main gatehouses. The Bailey Fort is a fairly large multi-story affair with a fairly large central courtyard. Should the fortress ever be owned by someone of wealth and means, this courtyard would likely be covered with a wooden structure turning it into another great hall with additional stories above it.

The Spire looks out over the sea from the tip of Merman’s Bluff. Still made of the same white granite, it is a cramped and construction, restrained by the limited amount of land to work from. It is connected to the Bailey Fort via a stone bridge as well as a small tongue of rocky land that keeps the last part of the bluff from being a complete island.

keep-on-keeping-on

If one were to look directly down from the watch tower on the north side of the Bailey Fort, there is a cave leading into Merman’s Bluff with a small stone wharf connected to it. This postern gate to White Crag Fortress is intended to be well guarded, although the original door has been removed after it got stuck too often from rusting hinges and lock as well as swollen oak from the constant battering from the sea. In time it should be replaced by a properly oiled and tarred door, but for the time being the gateway remains open.

The main level of the structures wind up under the structures of the Bailey Fort leading eventually to a trap door opening into the fort proper. These structures are used as storage, guard rooms, and an escape route in case of emergency.

under-the-fortress

There is also a passage that leads up under the Spire, however it lacks an accessway into that structure (at one point there was such an access point, but a team of mechanical assassins used it to gain access to the spire and it was blocked off afterwards). This section contains a secret chamber that in turn has a trap door down to the lower chambers which are used as a secret dungeon for prisoners as well as an underwater escape route for those with the access and the means to travel underwater.

The tunnel leading underwater from these lowest passages proceeds 130 feet further from Merman’s Bluff and into a small cave 20 feet under water.

kraken-patreon-supported-banner

This map is made available to you under a free license for personal or commercial use under the “RELEASE THE KRAKEN” initiative thanks to the awesome supporters of my Patreon Campaign. Over 400 awesome patrons have come together to fund the site and these maps, making them free for your use.

Because of the incredible generosity of my patrons, I’m able to make this map free for commercial use also. Each month while funding is over the $400 mark, we choose a map from the blog’s extensive back catalog to retroactively release under this free commercial license. You can use, reuse, remix and/or modify the maps that are being published under the commercial license on a royalty-free basis as long as they include attribution (“Cartography by Dyson Logos” or “Maps by Dyson Logos”). For those that want/need a Creative Commons license, it would look something like this:

Creative Commons LicenseCartography by Dyson Logos is licensed
under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

More Caves! More Chaos!

Last post I put up six of the various caves of the legendary Caves of Chaos, a cavern-infested box canyon overrun by vile humanoids northeast of the Keep on the Borderlands. But Five is the true number of chaos (ignore the fools who claim it is 8), so here are five more caves of chaos, including the dread Shrine of Evil Chaos!

Bugbears and the Shunned Cave (Caves G & H)Bugbears and the Shunned Cave (Caves G & H)

The residents of these caves are significantly stronger individually than those of the earlier caves in the set. This set includes the lair of the foul bugbears who are fortunately few in number, as well as the wet “shunned cave” which is home to an owlbear and a foul ooze.

Minotaur's Labyrinth (Cave I)Minotaur’s Labyrinth (Cave I)

As if to drive the point home that the end of the box canyon is dangerous, it also includes the labyrinth of a mighty minotaur – enchanted of course so that the intersections are always in the wrong directions and it becomes ridiculously easy to become lost and confused.

Gnoll Lair (Cave J)Gnoll Lair (Cave J)

South of the final Shrine of Evil Chaos (and connected via secret passage) is the lair of a small number of the fierce hyena-warriors that some call beastmen and others call gnolls.

Shrine of Evil Chaos (Cave K)Shrine of Evil Chaos (Cave K)

And finally, the Shrine of Evil Chaos itself – the centrepiece of this collection of caves, ominously looking down over the box canyon from the back. This extensive set of caves has been finished and cut and most of it bears little resemblance to the natural caves that were once here. This is the home of the evil that is bringing the many humanoids of the caves together in one place and keeping them from each others’ throats.

patreon-supported-banner

The maps on Dyson’s Dodecahedron are released for free personal use thanks to the support of awesome patrons like you over on Patreon. Every month 400 patrons come together to make these releases possible. You can help too in order to keep the flow of maps coming and to improve their quality – and even get a map of your own!

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

Ssa-Tun’s Lake of Milk

When activated through specific rituals “when the stars are right”, the three pillars of Ssa-Tun act as portals to anchor points in the Alabaster Hells. One of the three pillar-gates leads here, to a small cavern containing a lake of milky-white fluid. As with most things in the Alabaster Hells, everything here is not-quite-white in colour – from the pale grey walls to the heavy quartz pillars that seem to hold up the ceiling of the cave, to the milky-white liquid that seems to be slowly filling the cave.

Ssa-Tun's Lake of MilkSsa-Tun’s Lake of Milk

Guests here quickly discover that the pillar in the centre of the alabaster node doesn’t act as a return gate – and instead they must return through one of the four other gates that can be summoned. At the end of each row of quartz pillars a gate can be called with a quick ritual and splashing the milky waters on the inward faces of the two pillars in question. The ritual, fortunately, is inscribed on the walls of the hall to the “west”. The waters, unfortunately, are both toxic and strongly alkali.

And most importantly, it would be foolish to thing that nothing resides under those waters…

patreon-supported-banner

The maps on Dyson’s Dodecahedron are released for free personal use thanks to the support of awesome patrons like you over on Patreon. Every month 400 patrons come together to make these releases possible. You can help too in order to keep the flow of maps coming and to improve their quality – and even get a map of your own!

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

Heart of Darkling – DiTullio Islands

Several rivers run into the Darkling Lake – the vast underground “sea” at the end of the Darkling River. The Ditullio Islands are a small fishing community of mad derro tucked against the shore of the Darkling Lake where two smaller rivers enter it.

DiTullio IslandsDiTullio Islands

The DiTullio derro are paranoid and hostile to everyone, and often to each other. But they truly fear the aboleth lords who lurk in the darkest depths of the Darkling Lake. They have erected a number of small stone houses on their islands, and laid claim to a heavy stone tower that predates their settlement (likely crafted by magic as the stone is nearly perfectly smooth).

They fish on their boats when they seek solitude, but most of their food comes from the fishing nets set to capture fish that come from the smaller river outlet which pours into the Darkling down a twelve foot waterfall. The constant sound of the waterfall only serves to heighten the paranoia of the Derro, but they dare not move away from it as it is their best food source.

patreon-supported-banner

This map is made available to you under a free license for personal or commercial use thanks to the awesome supporters of my Patreon Campaign. Over 400 amazingly generous people have come together to fund the site and these maps, making them free for your use.

Because of the incredible generosity of my patrons, I’m able to make these maps free for commercial use also. Each month while funding is over the $300 mark, each map that achieves the $300+ funding level will be released under this free commercial license. You can use, reuse, remix and/or modify the maps that are being published under this commercial license on a royalty-free basis as long as they include attribution (“Cartography by Dyson Logos” or “Maps by Dyson Logos”). For those that want/need a Creative Commons license, it would look something like this:

Creative Commons LicenseCartography by Dyson Logos is licensed
under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

Four Against Darkness – Proving Grounds of the Mad Ogre Lord

One more game of Four Against Darkness and it proved (finally) that with familiarity I can actually get a game played in the time suggested (45 minutes). Again, this was played using the suggested half-sheet page size (it is actually on the same page as the Crypt of the Queen of Bones), so it is somewhat more dense than the first dungeon I explored.

Proving Grounds of the Mad Ogre LordProving Grounds of the Mad Ogre Lord

This game included the first time I’ve ever actually worried about the fates of my characters in combat (as opposed to worrying about the medusa’s gaze). My dice were against me and The Mad Ogre Lord was nigh unassailable, and if the Priest of Marduk hadn’t intervened with two healing spells during the battle, Red Dougal the rogue would have been reduced to an ugly red smear on the floor.

But in the end the Ogre fell, Red Dougal picked up our first magic weapon (a small magical club), and we proved ourselves in the Proving Grounds of the Mad Ogre Lord. The party is now levels 2, 3, 4, and 3. The plan is to get this crew to level 5 and then try out the Four Against the Abyss rules… Then later I’ll start a new party and try the various adventures I’ve bought for the game.

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

Wharton Mine

Old Wharton Mine was a small local source of onyx in its prime, but its location deep in the jungle made it nigh impossible to maintain supply lines or defenses. In the end the mine was abandoned because of prowling beasts and the difficulty in maintaining a workforce out here.

Wharton MineWharton Mine

But onyx is a troubling stone. It is the standard material component for animating the dead, and it seems some dark magic is present in the old mine as well as many chips and bits of black and white banded onyx. Now the dead crawl the mine, waiting for prey to kill and try to consume. Animals that came here to get out of the heat were the first victims, but the other beasts of the area have learned to avoid it.

Now the dead wait for those foolhardy enough to try to reopen the mine, or to claim the onyx that remains.

patreon-supported-banner

This map is made available to you under a free license for personal or commercial use thanks to the awesome supporters of my Patreon Campaign. Over 400 amazingly generous people have come together to fund the site and these maps, making them free for your use.

Because of the incredible generosity of my patrons, I’m able to make these maps free for commercial use also. Each month while funding is over the $300 mark, each map that achieves the $300+ funding level will be released under this free commercial license. You can use, reuse, remix and/or modify the maps that are being published under this commercial license on a royalty-free basis as long as they include attribution (“Cartography by Dyson Logos” or “Maps by Dyson Logos”). For those that want/need a Creative Commons license, it would look something like this:

Creative Commons LicenseCartography by Dyson Logos is licensed
under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

Four Against Darkness – Crypt of the Queen of Bones

Back for another game of Four Against Darkness!

One of the things I noted after last game is that they recommend what is effectively a half-page of graph paper as the maximum size for a dungeon (whereas the Temple of the Jade Gorgon took up most of a full page). The reduced page size makes for a more dense feeling dungeon, and also means you run out of room faster thus precipitating the battle with the final boss monster.

Crypt of the Queen of BonesCrypt of the Queen of Bones

This session involved fighting a LOT of undead – skeletons, zombies, skeletal rats, more skeletons… and the final encounter was once again the terrifying Medusa. This time she only managed to petrify two party members, and I’ve armed myself with insurance against future medusa encounters as I’ve found two blessing scrolls throughout the dungeon – so the elf and the rogue both carry one in case the cleric gets petrified.

The crypts also included my first run with a secret door and a puzzle/trap that we easily defeated. I used my methodology from running many games using the AD&D random dungeon generation tables to mash areas together when they collide, so the dungeon layout has more loops in the overall design – if a room comes really close to another doorway, just link them together and make it easy on yourself.

At the end of this session, the party was a mix of levels 2 & 3, so we’ll need to head down again and try to even things out. Or I could just keep emphasis on the Jale Man Barbarian to make him a slaughtering machine – his rage attack killed the Medusa in this dungeon in a single round of mashing and smashing.

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
Logo

Abonnez-vous au blog !

Saisissez votre adresse e-mail pour vous abonner à ce blog et recevoir une notification de chaque nouvel article par email.

Rejoignez les 9 autres abonnés

Calendrier des articles

août 2019
L M M J V S D
« Juil    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  


(A)D&D Covers

D&D5-Hoard-Of-the-Dragon-Queen

Catégories

Archives

Qui est en ligne ?

Aucun membre ne se trouve actuellement sur le site
Aller à la barre d’outils