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2019 Geomorphs – Set 4

Nearly a decade ago I spent most of a year drawing and posting geomorphs to this blog. This year’s Kickstarter for a new series of DungeonMorph dice from Inkwell Ideas brought me back to drawing them again… with the slight stylistic improvement of a decade of experience.

2019 Geomorphs - Set 42019 Geomorphs – Set 4

Clockwise from top left we’ve got:

  • Shrine / Temple complex with secret reliquary.
  • Forge / Workshops
  • Magic Pool
  • Crypts / Tombs

And of course, while these geomorphs work great with each other (and the thousand or so compatible morphs collected by Dave @ www.davesmapper.com ) but also with the four dungeon levels of the Geomorphic Halls.

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The maps on Dyson’s Dodecahedron are released for free personal use thanks to the support of awesome patrons like you over on Patreon. Every month 400 patrons come together to make these releases possible. You can help too in order to keep the flow of maps coming and to improve their quality – and even get a map of your own!

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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Dungeoneer’s Survival Guide Perspective Map

When I got a copy of the Dungeoneer’s Survival Guide some 33 years ago, it was a flood of information, rules I would consistently ignore, scraps about the underdark for the first time since the D series of adventures…

And a collection of pages at the back on drawing perspective-based maps. Not the isometric (axonometric) projections of Castle Ravenloft, but grids set at various perspectives and rotations along with instructions on photocopying and cutting them up, or tracing them in order to draw multi-tiered maps of some of the larger spaces in the underdark.

33 years later, I finally did it.

I ended up choosing a grid that looks a lot like an isometric projection instead of a perspective piece, and following the directions for tracing the grid for a section, then moving the grid and tracing the next section produces very… vertical separations between elevations.

Dungeoneer Survival Guide Projection 1Dungeoneer Survival Guide Projection 1

The end result is a multi-tiered open space to explore – a large uneven “cave” (that has definitely been modified by the residents over the ages) with ramps and stairs between sections.

I’m definitely going to take another shot at this using a grid that has a stronger perspective and probably a smaller space to try to make something more like a traditional cavern. But I’m spectacularly happy with this piece, and glad that I finally drew it after 33 years of “planning to draw it”.

patreon-supported-banner

The maps on Dyson’s Dodecahedron are released for free personal use thanks to the support of awesome patrons like you over on Patreon. Every month 400 patrons come together to make these releases possible. You can help too in order to keep the flow of maps coming and to improve their quality – and even get a map of your own!

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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[Daily Drawings] Week of June 16th

I’ve been trying to get back into the groove I hit last year of drawing something every day. Sometimes a doodle, sometimes an attempt at an illustration. I don’t want to post one drawing every day to the blog (there are days I have little to say about it, and there are illos I’m not all that happy with – plus, that’s not the focus of the blog).

So instead I’ll try to compile my week’s drawings and doodles into one post like this.

Screaming into the voidScreaming into the void

Young Fighter

Young Fighter

Beholderish

Beholderish

Dodecahedral

Dodecahedral

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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[Doodle] Dodecahedron

Woke up the other morning and couldn’t deal with drawing some more rough drafts of maps for a commission, so I started with a quick drawing exercise and drew this crunchy dodecahedron.

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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Dysons & Doodles Compiled






A few years ago I tried to take on #Inktober (or was it #Drawlloween?) with sharpies and pens and managed to get partway through the month before other things interfered. Last year I decided to map my way through Inktober & Mapvember (61 maps in 61 days – that’s a hefty chunk of the 150-170 maps I draw every year!).






So I bought some new sharpie markers (because I really like the freedom that comes with a fat black free-flowing marker) and decided I’d try drawing something, ANYTHING, every day. It started simple, with elements from the various games I was playing in.







It didn’t take long (four days?) before I was adding detail work with my usual felt-tipped technical pens and exploring elements from a variety of games I am or have been involved in.






And from that it wasn’t much of a leap into drawing stuff meant to go INTO those games and books. To try to work on a style that could be used for illustrations for games. Hell, to establish a “style” at all instead of a continued series of doodles and drawings.






So now I look back and I’ve got 113 days of these daily drawings. I started posting them to the blog in batches, but never finished the set. So here’s a post that collects most of them – many of these appear in the Dyson Logos edition of Neoclassical Geek Revival.







Unfortunately, the streak of daily drawings was broken when my schedule took a beating last fall while working on the maps for Ghosts of Saltmarsh for Wizards of the Coast.









A number of these illustrations made it into the two waves of Tshirts and similar merchandise I have up on RedBubble. At some point I’ll add to that collection with some of the works on this page, but also a number of design ideas I’ve still got rolling around in my head…








It turns out that writing notes to go with 100 illustrations starts to be harder than drawing the illustrations in question. Around this point my rough version of this post starts just having the word “stuff” between the mini-galleries of illos.







As we roll into the later illustrations in the series, they become very RPG-book oriented as by this point I had agreed to illustrate an edition of Neoclassical Geek Revival, so the vast majority of my daily drawings are specifically to accomplish this task.










I also start moving away from heavy use of the Sharpie marker as we progress through the series – moving more and more to technical pens using the Sharpies only for large black fills like the witch’s breath in the series below.







Here we reach the last of the drawings that made it into the NGR book. I had to pick a point at which to say “all right, that’s it – here’s a pile of illustrations for the book, go wild!” instead of a constant “well, here’s one more… and one more…”







And then suddenly we are in Inktober again – the project that first inspired this whole attempt at a daily drawing back in 2014.

 








But Inktober, unsurprisingly, was my downfall. As we hit the series of prompt words I found myself more and more strained to draw something that fit (or to try and subvert the more obvious concept pieces), and then the contract workload cranked up and I found myself without the time to keep at it.







So here we are a full year after I started this project, and I’m cramming the time in to draw something new every few days. Maybe in time I’ll get it back to daily. 🙂

 

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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Dysons & Doodles Compiled






A few years ago I tried to take on #Inktober (or was it #Drawlloween?) with sharpies and pens and managed to get partway through the month before other things interfered. Last year I decided to map my way through Inktober & Mapvember (61 maps in 61 days – that’s a hefty chunk of the 150-170 maps I draw every year!).






So I bought some new sharpie markers (because I really like the freedom that comes with a fat black free-flowing marker) and decided I’d try drawing something, ANYTHING, every day. It started simple, with elements from the various games I was playing in.







It didn’t take long (four days?) before I was adding detail work with my usual felt-tipped technical pens and exploring elements from a variety of games I am or have been involved in.






And from that it wasn’t much of a leap into drawing stuff meant to go INTO those games and books. To try to work on a style that could be used for illustrations for games. Hell, to establish a “style” at all instead of a continued series of doodles and drawings.






So now I look back and I’ve got 113 days of these daily drawings. I started posting them to the blog in batches, but never finished the set. So here’s a post that collects most of them – many of these appear in the Dyson Logos edition of Neoclassical Geek Revival.







Unfortunately, the streak of daily drawings was broken when my schedule took a beating last fall while working on the maps for Ghosts of Saltmarsh for Wizards of the Coast.









A number of these illustrations made it into the two waves of Tshirts and similar merchandise I have up on RedBubble. At some point I’ll add to that collection with some of the works on this page, but also a number of design ideas I’ve still got rolling around in my head…








It turns out that writing notes to go with 100 illustrations starts to be harder than drawing the illustrations in question. Around this point my rough version of this post starts just having the word “stuff” between the mini-galleries of illos.







As we roll into the later illustrations in the series, they become very RPG-book oriented as by this point I had agreed to illustrate an edition of Neoclassical Geek Revival, so the vast majority of my daily drawings are specifically to accomplish this task.










I also start moving away from heavy use of the Sharpie marker as we progress through the series – moving more and more to technical pens using the Sharpies only for large black fills like the witch’s breath in the series below.







Here we reach the last of the drawings that made it into the NGR book. I had to pick a point at which to say “all right, that’s it – here’s a pile of illustrations for the book, go wild!” instead of a constant “well, here’s one more… and one more…”







And then suddenly we are in Inktober again – the project that first inspired this whole attempt at a daily drawing back in 2014.

 








But Inktober, unsurprisingly, was my downfall. As we hit the series of prompt words I found myself more and more strained to draw something that fit (or to try and subvert the more obvious concept pieces), and then the contract workload cranked up and I found myself without the time to keep at it.







So here we are a full year after I started this project, and I’m cramming the time in to draw something new every few days. Maybe in time I’ll get it back to daily. 🙂

 

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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Ashryn Spire

Potent wizards locked away in their towers working on mighty magics… This is the way it has been in tales, and thus this is the way many wizards operate to this day. Ashryn Spire is such a wizard’s tower, erected to provide a safe space for wizardly work far enough from civilization that no one should take too much interest, and defensible enough that if they do take interest there’s very little they can do.

Ashryn SpireAshryn Spire

Fingers of otherworldly minerals reach up from the roof of the tower, drawing energies down from the ether into this world – charging strange magics and empowering spells beyond their normal boundaries.

“The wizard of Ashryn Spire” seems to be a child – maybe in their early teens. Some say the wizard does not age, but those who remember the construction of the tower suggest that the wizard seems to be aging very slowly… and in reverse of the common methodology of growing older.

Only other wizards and their ilk have ever been seen visiting the tower – usually arriving via magic or unusual conveyances such as lightning-strike chariots, standing on the backs of a flock of miniature pegasi, and so on. The general assumption is that the wizard of the spire’s primary guests are from other worlds – places known by nicknames such as the Yellow Hells, the Land of Ink, and the Infinite Violet Sea.

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This map is made available to you under a free license for personal or commercial use thanks to the awesome supporters of my Patreon Campaign. Over 400 amazingly generous people have come together to fund the site and these maps, making them free for your use.

Because of the incredible generosity of my patrons, I’m able to make these maps free for commercial use also. Each month while funding is over the $300 mark, each map that achieves the $300+ funding level will be released under this free commercial license. You can use, reuse, remix and/or modify the maps that are being published under this commercial license on a royalty-free basis as long as they include attribution (“Cartography by Dyson Logos” or “Maps by Dyson Logos”). For those that want/need a Creative Commons license, it would look something like this:

Creative Commons LicenseCartography by Dyson Logos is licensed
under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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Pride Dice

I drew these last year during my “drawing a day” spree in the late summer / early fall. I made them into a tshirt design at the time and then pulled them up yesterday for my social media feeds.

I also made versions that take up a bit more space, making them better suited for use on Facebook. The version above was first, but Facebook puts your face RIGHT where the d20 is, so this was next.

I’m posting copies of these graphics here because Facebook mangles graphics so badly that they look horribly distorted on people’s pages when they grab the ones posted there.

I’ve received the usual snide allegations of “virtue signalling” and the usual crap from people who somehow see being positive and nice as a horrible character flaw. But the block filters are strong. Happy pride.

And always remember, Stonewall was a riot.

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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Geomorphic Halls – Level 1

Ever since I started drawing Geomorphs, I’ve had the intention of making a dungeon that took advantage of them to have sections of the dungeon that change from visit to visit – visually based in part on the map of Lankhmar in the old Lankhmar D&D sourcebook.



Thus, every time you enter the dungeon, some sections remain the same, and some sections change. Further, due to the vagaries of geomorph design, some sections may become completely locked out in some visits, and some hard-to reach areas may suddenly be available.

Geomorphic Halls Level 1Geomorphic Halls Level 1

My goal is to make a set of 4 or more dungeon levels that each contain 2+ geomorphs. Further expansion is easily possible by just “plugging in” a geomorph to any of the edge rooms or corridors and adding new structures that way.

And there are a LOT of geomorphs to choose from these days. There are well over a thousand of them on Dave’s Mapper these days, not counting the huge new collection being put together by myself and a number of other cartographers for the latest DungeonMorph Dice Kickstarter.

patreon-supported-banner

The maps on Dyson’s Dodecahedron are released for free personal use thanks to the support of awesome patrons like you over on Patreon. Every month 400 patrons come together to make these releases possible. You can help too in order to keep the flow of maps coming and to improve their quality – and even get a map of your own!

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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Chris Cold

Dessinateur biélorusse vivant en Espagne, il a découvert les jeux de rôle via World of Warcraft. Aujourd’hui il n’a plus le temps ou les partenaires pour jouer, ce qui ne l’a pas empêché de dessiner pour Invisible Sun.

(Source: Guide du Rôliste Galactique : les dernières news du jeu de rôles)
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Fantasy Trip Colour Playmats

I finally got the opportunity to open up the massive Fantasy Trip box from Steve Jackson Games and pull out the playmats I drew for them. I’ve seen a bunch of shots of them in play with minis on them but it is hard to get the scale across.

The one on the left is 2 feet by 2 feet, and the blue one is two feet by 18 inches.

They are huge, floppy, colourful toys. Having them in hand now is incredibly cool.

But don’t despair if you didn’t get them in the Kickstarter last year, they are BACK!
The Fantasy Trip playmatsThe Fantasy Trip playmats

They’ve been brought back as add-ons in the Decks of Destiny Kickstarter going on now.

But there’s more. They’ve been joined by another original map design by Steve Jackson that I had the pleasure of drawing before handing the colouring off to Phil Reed.

Another 24″ x 24″ mat, this one is a hexagonal labyrinthine arena available in two different colour palettes.

Labyrinth PlaymatsLabyrinth Playmats

At first I preferred the “B” colour job, but honestly, A is incredibly weird and vibrant and just excellent – and it stands out from the existing playmats (and just about anything else you could put on the table with it).

Want cool Dyson mats with 1.5″ hexes? Head over to the Decks of Destiny Kickstarter to get them!

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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More Geomorphic Dungeons – with Dice!

TL;DR: Four new geomorphs in a flashback to a decade ago, and the DungeonMorph Dice Kickstarter is going strong and moving in on $10k of the $15k target!

It is always kind of exciting being involved in a Kickstarter as it goes live. And this one is a great reminder of when I first started working on maps for the blog. It is refreshing to go back to my classic geomorph concepts and start drawing new ones again.

Doubly so knowing that they will be translated onto dice as we move forward! Joe over at Inkwell Ideas is Kickstarting 3 new sets of DungeonMorph Dice and I’m developing designs so we’ll have a Dyson map on every die in the set.

2019 Inkwell Geomorph Set 22019 Inkwell Geomorph Set 2

This set of 4 are (clockwise from upper left):

  • Barracks Dungeon Geomorph – The main feature here is a barracks room with two attached latrines and a commander’s office and quarters adjacent to it.
  • Tombs and Crypts Geomorph – Reminiscent of my Spiral Crypt design that was used in the Shadows of Forgotten Kings adventure, but much more compact.
  • Water Feature Cavern Geomorph – linking dungeons to caverns, we have a small oddly shaped lake that is used as a well and water storage in the dungeon section, and perhaps a shrine in the area to the southeast.
  • Large Cavern Geomorph – A larger cave to explore, with a few raised and lowered sections to it.

patreon-supported-banner

The maps on Dyson’s Dodecahedron are released for free personal use thanks to the support of awesome patrons like you over on Patreon. Every month 400 patrons come together to make these releases possible. You can help too in order to keep the flow of maps coming and to improve their quality – and even get a map of your own!

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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2019 Geomorphs & Dice!

If we set the wayback machine to nearly a decade ago, there’s essentially a full year where I posted nothing but geomorphs to the blog. Behind the scenes I spent a couple of months working on geomorph concepts to figure out what format worked well enough that it was not too apparent when you moved from one geomorph to the next.

I was originally going to work with Erol Otus’ “Geomorphic Mini Dungeon Modules” format of 11 x 11 with entrances in the sixth square on each side, but it was way too obvious when you moved from one to the next – it felt like you were exploring geomorphs instead of a cohesive map.

After about a dozen designs, I settled on these 10 x 10 geomorphs with entrances on squares 3 & 8. The design caught on and there are thousands of geomorphs available on the net that use this structure now.

As you can see in the photo, I’ve started drawing them again. I’m making a dozen or so new geomorphs that I’ll be posting to the blog over the next while. As with most of my modern work, they are available here as 1200dpi images – but there’s a whole other way you can get them…

Joe at Inkwell Ideas has launched a new Dungeonmorph Dice Kickstarter. The new geomorphs that I post to the blog will be appearing on these new dice. The last batch of Dungeonmorph Dice were awesome – big wonderful chunky dice with a huge number of geomorphs drawn by myself and other geomorphers from the community.

I’m really excited to be part of doing this again.

Every die in this new set will have at least one face that I designed.

2019 Inkwell Geomorph Set 12019 Inkwell Geomorph Set 1

Here’s the first set of geomorph designs. The first two are prison/jail complexes (but likely only one of these two will appear on the final dice). The bottom row contains a worship area (a fairly large underworld temple) and a set of magical pools a la In Search of the Unknown.

Now, these high resolution designs shown here are not how they will look on the dice – these are 1200dpi drawings with each geomorph being 2 1/2 inches wide so you can use them in your games. Bringing them down to a resolution that can be engraved on a 1″ die involves the skillful reduction of details to maintain the structure and all the primary details to make them easy to read at the smaller size (and able to be engraved consistently and legibly).

So go check out the Kickstarter now, and get in on these Dungeonmorph Dice!

patreon-supported-banner

The maps on Dyson’s Dodecahedron are released for free personal use thanks to the support of awesome patrons like you over on Patreon. Every month 400 patrons come together to make these releases possible. You can help too in order to keep the flow of maps coming and to improve their quality – and even get a map of your own!

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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Patreon Exclusive Content Coming Soon!

Starting this month I’ll be releasing something via my Patreon Campaign that will not be posted to the blog. Following on my promise and goal of keeping my maps free – the Patreon Exclusive release will never be a map.

Instead, I’m producing other interesting content that meshes my drawing and cartography with some graphic design and whatever my current obsession is to produce game aids. These will be shown off a bit on the blog, but the actual final product will be exclusive to my Patrons for at least a year, after which some might appear as commercial releases for people who missed the opportunity to pick them up through patronage.

This month I’ll be releasing the above pocketmod – Tales of the Ophidian Emperor. It is a one-page system neutral adventure framework built up around a map I posted last year finding and exploring the tomb of the titular emperor.

In coming months I have a few other projects getting ready including

  • a large selection of hand-drawn character sheet elements to make building character sheets for your own games easy through simply placing and overlaying the elements in question in Gimp or layout software.
  • a pack of 1.5″ dungeon hexes that will mesh perfectly with the new edition of The Fantasy Trip but are also fully usable with any other dungeoneering game.
  • An illustrated and updated re-release of the classic Dyson’s Delve “mini mega dungeon”.
  • And of course, future adventures and projects similar to Tales of the Ophidian Emperor.

Each release will be available to patrons at any patronage level as a thank you for the continued support. Most will never be re-released after this, and those that are will be commercial releases at least a year after the release through Patreon.

Tales of the Ophidian Emperor will be going live on Patreon this weekend for all supporters. You can get it and future exclusive releases for as little as $1 a month.

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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Catacombs of the Flayed Minotaurs

Beneath the buckled stone floors of the jungle ruins in the Tempest Gardens is a massive set of catacombs guarded by the eternal vigilance of fifteen deathless minotaurs.

Catacombs of the Flayed MinotaurCatacombs of the Flayed Minotaur

Each minotaur has endured the ages imprisoned within these catacombs in their own way, but none are untouched by time or violence. And they are not alone – while they can barely stand each other’s company, many have surrounded themselves with a few creatures that provide them with entertainment, food, or just the comfort of sharing a living space with others – even if (as in one case) they are little more than psionic protoplasmic slime.

This map was drawn at ledger size (11″ x 17″) at a scale of 6 squares per inch. Part way through drawing it I decided it would be fun to stick in an “easter egg” like the classic Quasqueton map showing up in Undermountain – so I added bits of maps from B2, X1 and T1 as I went. Because the map is so big, it ends up being a very large file. The 600dpi version linked to above is almost 4 Mb. Normally I release my maps in 1200dpi – but that’s a massive file size difference – so I’ve included the 1200dpi version as a download here at 9.4Mb: [Download 1200dpi Copy]

patreon-supported-banner

The maps on Dyson’s Dodecahedron are released for free personal use thanks to the support of awesome patrons like you over on Patreon. Every month 400 patrons come together to make these releases possible. You can help too in order to keep the flow of maps coming and to improve their quality – and even get a map of your own!

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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Temple of the Mad Titan

I’m often asked about the scale of the maps I post. In truth, I don’t include a scale on my maps because either it is pretty obvious (when drawing houses and similar structures – where a square is 3 to 5 feet), or more likely because I want the end user to pick a scale that works best for them. In the inner workings of my head, you can assume that I’m thinking at a scale of 10′ per square when drawing most of my maps as that is the traditional scale for D&D maps which is where I cut my teeth.

Temple of the Mad TitanTemple of the Mad Titan

But for the Temple of the Mad Titan, 10 feet per square just isn’t going to cut it. Let’s crank this one up to 20 or maybe even 50 feet. A structure of Brobdingnagian proportions, the temple is made of almost inconceivably large blocks of stone and rests atop a massive cloud. At the heart of this immense structure is the throne of the mad titan.

But he is rarely found there – but always nearby. He is bound to the throne by magical chains that give him some freedom of movement within the structure, but not quite enough to get to the massive entrance and thus he is trapped here with freedom always just in sight. Some days he stands in the great hall in front of the heart chamber and raves against his captors and the world. On bad days he will hide behind the throne or in one of the nearby alcoves, hiding from the light of day and the fresh air.

patreon-supported-banner

The maps on Dyson’s Dodecahedron are released for free personal use thanks to the support of awesome patrons like you over on Patreon. Every month 400 patrons come together to make these releases possible. You can help too in order to keep the flow of maps coming and to improve their quality – and even get a map of your own!

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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Guillaume Jentey

Il a commencé le JdR le jour de l’explosion de Tchernobyl. Après une période active et une sans JdR, il s’est non seulement remis à jouer, mais aussi à dessiner (pour Trinités, Dungeon World), à créer, à transmettre…

(Source: Guide du Rôliste Galactique : les dernières news du jeu de rôles)
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9 years of maps!

In May the Dodecahedron will be a decade old… and that has me in “holy crap, flashbacks!” mode. So I thought I should pull up a self-indulgent look-and-see of how my cartography has changed over the last nine years.

I’m posting two maps from each year, one in June and one in December of that year, and focusing on dungeon maps primarily to keep the comparisons “fair”. That map at the top of 2009 was one of the very first I ever posted to the blog. It is painfully low-resolution and it turns out I can’t find the original anywhere, and don’t have any higher resolution scans of it around. I might even redraw it at some point.

Much of the end of 2009 and 2010 was spent on my “Geomorph Mapping Project” to draw at least 100 interlocking geomorphs. We closed out 2010 with Dyson’s Delve, my mini-mega-dungeon. In 2009 and 2010 I still use “pencil thin” walls – as you can see in the geomorphs and the Dyson’s Delve map. This is something I moved rapidly away from as I developed my style, and have only started sort of coming back to (using thick sharpie markers for walls) in the last year.

These two maps from 2011 showcase my work as it locks into a definite style – avoiding single-stroke walls, adding more detail, and obviously a lot more comfortable with my work. The thick black walls and heavy hatching have become very clear by this point and many of the maps from this year are among my favourites of my older work.

2012 was a bit of a rough spell for me. When I started posting to the blog I was off work on disability for nerve damage. When my workplace disability ran out and I was transferring over to the provincial disability program, I went through several months on the lowest tier of social support, and this kept me from both the internet and from doing much drawing. The maps in 2012 are much sparser and less defined than in 2011, and are a lot less frequent on the blog. But that all changed in December of 2012 with the release of Dyson’s Delves…

2013 sees my maps pick up in quality and quantity again. The feel of the 2011 maps returns, with more time spent per map and a lot of effort put into presentation and structure. This is the year where I start transitioning away from generic black gel pens for my maps and towards using archival felt-tipped pens (Mistubishi Uni Pins and Sakura Microns mostly). More and more of my maps are now being drawn with a grid base – not usually shown on the map proper, but most of the maps in this era through to the end of 2015 are drawn on graph paper, making them easier to use with traditional VTTs and similar.

2014 and 2015 exemplify the style I had developed up to this point. I stabilize to a regular release schedule of maps twice a week. The style is consistent and easy to read. The winter of 2014 includes the release of the Dyson Megadelve, a massive megadungeon project that spans over 30 maps of caverns, dungeons, mines, and the ruins of a dwarven city.

2015 sees the lines for walls gradually getting darker and heavier, making the maps that little bit easier to read.

2015 sees another big stylistic transition in my maps. First I move away from drawing on graph paper, instead drawing on white paper with a sheet of graph paper behind it as a guide.  The black lines of my walls thicken yet again, and for a large number of maps I move away from a photoshopped grid to a hand-drawn one.

The hand-drawn grid goes through several styles and iterations over the next few years. Some are better than others, and quite frankly some are disappointing when I look back on them now. Towards the end of the year I also transition from releasing maps as grayscale 300dpi JPG files to black and white 1200 dpi PNGs.

My work this year included a lot of larger commercial projects in addition to my blog maps – and again my style grows and changes. I get into more fine details and in the fall of 2018 I started doing more work digitally after drawing the map in my traditional manner – I often add a bit of shade to the crosshatched areas now, and a fine shadow to help make the walls feel a bit more raised.

 

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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Two Old School D&D Character Sheets

As my cleric in the Monday night games levels up, I experiment with new character sheet designs.

At level 6 I made him this sheet:

Which I’m making available for your use here (click on the graphic for the PDF of the sheet):

Summer 2018 Character SheetSummer 2018 Character Sheet (click for PDF)

On making it to level 7, I initially considered transferring him to a classic D&D character sheet.

But no matter the nostalgia of the sheet, I just don’t appreciate the way it arranges data. So once again I started drawing a new sheet for Garab based on his last sheet but a little tighter.

And this is the result. So I’ve also made it available for download in PDF (click on the image below to get the PDF).

Fall 2018 Sheet (click for PDF)

Fall 2018 Sheet (click for PDF)

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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Prince’s Harbour – Map 2

This month’s map of Prince’s Harbour is set at the outlet of the Gnoll’s Ear River into the Prince’s Harbour itself off the Flindhome River. Land along the Gnoll’s Ear is rough and rocky, making it poor farmland in most cases except in small stretches where significant soil has built up.

Prince's Harbour - Map 2Prince’s Harbour – Map 2

The Gnoll’s Ear has a bad reputation, a rough current, and a lot of rocks, so few homes are built along it proper – instead most people build homes nearby, tucked into the forest or along the roads outside of the main streets of Prince’s Harbour itself just to the north. Properties here are a mix of subsistence farming and lower class residential for those who work for the craftsfolk and richer families in town.

The main reason adventurers may find themselves in this area is a passing interest in the burned ruins of a major structure on the partial peninsula formed by the Gnoll’s Ear, or just when travelling through the area.

Prince's Harbour - Map 2 (no hexes)Prince’s Harbour – Map 2 (no hexes)

The ruins were a three-story stone manor house and outbuildings – there used to be a road between them and Jendson’s Mine on Map 1, but it is almost entirely lost to nature now. The ruins have been used as a meeting place and “haunted ruins” dares by the youth of Prince’s Harbour for a couple of generations now, so everyone would be quite surprised if it turned out that there was indeed a secret haunted basement to the structure that can only be found by someone carrying the magical key to it.

Each hex on the map is roughly 100 feet face-to-face. The Prince’s Harbour maps are the first set of maps on the blog drawn entirely digitally in Photoshop – which has been a learning curve for me. Because I was in the middle of a major learning curve drawing this, they are being released as 300dpi jpgs instead of my usual 1200 dpi pngs. There will be a total of 9 maps in the set when complete.

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This map is made available to you under a free license for personal or commercial use thanks to the awesome supporters of my Patreon Campaign. Over 400 amazingly generous people have come together to fund the site and these maps, making them free for your use.

Because of the incredible generosity of my patrons, I’m able to make these maps free for commercial use also. Each month while funding is over the $300 mark, each map that achieves the $300+ funding level will be released under this free commercial license. You can use, reuse, remix and/or modify the maps that are being published under this commercial license on a royalty-free basis as long as they include attribution (“Cartography by Dyson Logos” or “Maps by Dyson Logos”). For those that want/need a Creative Commons license, it would look something like this:

Creative Commons LicenseCartography by Dyson Logos is licensed
under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

(Source: Dyson’s Dodecahedron)
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